Life Should Be A Musical

ashkenazi-autie:

asktheteamofscientists:

scifi-reality:

"Women have to protect other women"
"Women have to protect other women"
"Women have to protect other women"
"Women have to protect other women"
"Women have to protect other women"
"Women have to protect other women"
"Women have to protect other women"
"Women have to protect other women"
"Women have to protect other women"

And that means white women protecting WOC.
Cis women protecting trans women.
Straight women protecting queer women.
Abled women protecting disabled women.
Not just white cishet abled women protecting other white cishet abled women.

Not to mention that the woman in the gif is Angel Haze, a pansexual black indigenous woman  (who has some Native ancestry). 

[angel haze highly values her native ancestry, she’s a member of cherokee nation and taught herself tsalagi, and it’s important that we acknowledge that, esp. considering the lack of native american voice in so much media]

ask-gallows-callibrator:

msrmoony:

If you ever date an asexual person be sure to get the specifics of their asexuality because the level of comfort with physical contact is different for all of us.

YES 
THIS IS SERIOUSLY IMPORTANT 

serkets:

itsgayerinenochian:

creepyjirachi:

"you can’t be just friends with people of the gender you’re attracted to"
myth actually true. i, as a bisexual, can confirm that i have no friends.

pansexuals spend their lives in solitude, with only rocks for company

meanwhile asexuals are friends with everyone. literally every single person on the planet. i do not know how i remember so many names

Julie d’Aubigny: Princess of the Opera (1670-1707)

rejectedprincesses:

image

This week we turn our attention to La Maupin, Julie d’Aubigny: sword-slinger, opera singer, and larger-than-life bisexual celebrity of 17th century France. Her life was a whirlwind of duels, seduction, graverobbing, and convent-burning so intense that she had to be pardoned by the king of France TWICE. Read on for more.

Read More

TO DO LIST: Write a musical about this woman.

"We need to recognize that for some people sex is great and for some sex is horrific and for some it’s on par with folding laundry."

deviantfemme:

dotterall:

(~Sex Isn’t Always Good by queenieofaces)

This is a critical part of sex positivity that tends to be overlooked. Let’s celebrate empowering amazing sex and the choice to not have sex, or only have certain kinds of sex. 

Being a feminist doesn’t mean suddenly no longer liking problematic things. If you stopped liking everything that was sexist in media and entertainment there would be no media or entertainment left. Being a feminist, to me, is being aware of what it is you’re liking, and of its problematic aspects.

(via thingssheloves)

(Also relevant to problems of race, gender, etcetera.)

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)

whoo boy am I sick of this, yuuuup

(via faitherinhicks)

I never thought about it like this before, not in conscious terms, but yeah, I’ve noticed this, too. This is really crappy!

(via rosalarian)

anitafucking:

jessiedress:

oldpuppy:

queerandpresentdanger:

Scenes from Fat: the Play, a play some friends and I cowrote and performed about being fat queer femmes. We entered into Frontera Festival, a short play festival, in Austin and performed initially on Friday. We were then chosen for Best of the Week, and after Saturday’s performance have been selected to go on to Best of the Festival. We will perform two more times this week.

This play was written by BunnyDanJulesAltheaNicoleSandy, and myself and directed by Jules.

The director’s note goes as follows:

We are a group of fat femme-identified queers. Most of us are not actors and don’t identify as writers, but we have stories to tell. For two months, we have been meeting to talk and eat and cry and laugh and write about living in fat bodies. How do our different race, gender and class identities affect our experiences as fat people? How do we undo the internalized shame our culture has taught us? For so long this word has been used against us- to dehumanize us and to pathologize us:

Fat adjective: (of a person or animal) having a large amount of excess flesh.

But fat is not lazy. Fat is not ugly. Fat is not stupid. Fat is fun. Fat is beautiful. Fat is smart. Fat is sexy. 

Take a moment to consider how you think about fat people; about the fat people you see on t.v., the fat people you see in the super market, the fat people that you love. 

This is for you. But it is also for us. We ask you to bear witness to our reclamation.”

Photo credit to Beverly Bland Boydston.

this is so powerful and important, the whole world needs to see it.

Fat babes making art about being fat babes is always relevant to everyone’s interests.

😍😵had to reblog because I’m all over this shit

we-live-in-marvelous-times:

miscommunication as a plot device makes me angry

if you just talked to each other but no